botany

Nevada Researchers Trying to Turn Roadside Weed into Biofuel

RENO, Nev. | Three decades ago, a University of Nevada researcher who obtained one of the first U.S. Energy Department grants to study the potential to turn plants into biofuels became convinced that a roadside weed — curly top gumweed — was growing along the road to the future.

Sawtooth National Forest closes 5 campgrounds in South Hills

BURLEY — Five upper campgrounds in the South Hills will be closed Memorial Day weekend due to hazards following a snowstorm.

Final chance to order seedling trees

BURLEY — Plant a tree for Earth Day which is April 22. It’s a day of political action and civic participation. People all over the world march, sign petitions, meet with their elected officials, plant trees and clean up their towns and roads.

Final chance to order seedling trees

BURLEY — Plant a tree for Earth Day which is April 22. It’s a day of political action and civic participation. People all over the world march, sign petitions, meet with their elected officials, plant trees and clean up their towns and roads.

Garden Wise: Squash, pumpkin, gourd: What’s in a name?

In 2014, the Huffington Post carried an article titled, “Here’s Why Your Pumpkin Pie Probably Has No Pumpkin in It at All.” The subtitle shouted: “Lies, so Many Lies.”

Garden Wise: Getting the most out of your basil plants

Basil (Ocimum basilicum) with its rich, dark green leaves, redolent of anise and clove, is the most popular commercial culinary herb in America. Whether incorporated into pesto, paired with tomatoes and mozzarella or added to your favorite Italian dish, basil is a kitchen and garden staple. Along with its culinary popularity, what makes it so valuable to nurseries is its preference for a tropical climate. Even in warmer climates, it is a tender perennial. In local gardens, it is grown as a tender annual which provides nurseries repeat sales every spring.

Cereal pathologist: Scout fields for stripe rust

TWIN FALLS — A stormy pattern that has developed across the Magic Valley in mid-May is bringing much needed moisture to dryland but is also carrying with it spores of a potentially devastating small grain disease.